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nodle

The future of cooling

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Where do you see the future of cooling going for processors? With all the advancements in processor speeds, that usually means more heat. Air cooling is going to reach a max I believe even with the larger fans and heatpipes. Alot of people have gotten into watercooling, which when done right draws heat away much fast than air cooling. But I believe the future is with submersive cooling. You have probably seen this done with oil bathed computing. It's where you submerse your mainboard into a non-conductive oil and then cool the oil. Since it's non-conductive your electric circuits will not short out, theres for the oil pulls the heat away instantaneous resulting in excellent cooling. Now let's face it this type of cooling is messy and also dangerous if not properly done. But I foresee systems slowly switching over to watching cooling, then in the distant future slowly moving over to submersive cooling. Again this is just my speculation on where cooling technology is going. The other option is they come up with nano cooling which then requires no heatsink at all. If your interested I will post some pictures I have at home of some submersive system that amatuers have done.

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I have seen this and it is pretty interesting. I just don't know the real need for it though. If water cooling is efficiant enough and in it's early stages of being used then why go inot anything more advanced and complicated?

ANother thing they are trying is making processors that use less energy and disperse less heat. Either way, cooling is very important and the cooler the better. I use water cooling now and love it.

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I have seen this and it is pretty interesting. I just don't know the real need for it though. If water cooling is efficiant enough and in it's early stages of being used then why go inot anything more advanced and complicated?

Because with the higher the clock speed, the hotter the chip (usually). So there will come a day where even watercooling won't be able to stand the high heat. Again though, if they would find a new way to change the way the chips are made, and get into nano cooling etc. then there would be no need.

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Here's what Anandtech had to say on the subject which may be pertinent:

In the past 15 years, architectural improvements have made sure that the Pentium 4 issues and retires about 6 times more integer instructions each clock cycle than an Intel 486 could on average. At the same time, the die size would have been 15 times bigger if there were no advancements in silicon process technology, and even those aggressive advancements could not avoid the fact that the Pentium 4 needs almost 20 times as much power.

Clock speed increased from 33 MHz to 3800 MHz, so it is clear that clock speed, not extracting more ILP (Instruction Level Parallelism), has been the main reason why a Pentium 4 performs so much better than an i486.

However, the next generation of CPUs will be based on a completely different philosophy. The Xeon MP Version 2007, alias Whitefield, will have 4 cores, and run at speeds at around 2.6 GHz. At that speed, there are reports that it would consume less than 90 Watt. Intel will use its P-m know-how to keep the power dissipation so low. Each core is not really a P-m, but it is clear that the pipeline will be shorter than the one of Willamette, the first implementation of the Pentium 4s Netburst architecture.

AMDs K9 seems to be a slightly different beast. Andreas Stiller of Ct reported that this Quad core CPU monster would have a TDP of 140 Watt, and run at about 3 GHz.

So, it seems that clock speed will no longer drive performance, but higher IPC and more cores will.

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Don't you think they will need to increase the core speeds down the road though? I mean you can put 4 cores or even more on a chip, but basically your making your system a multiprocesor system. In time even if you got up to 8 cores, there gonna have to up the speed of the processor. But again with all the changes in technology they may go to something totally different. Again I was just basing off of the technology now.

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I can forsee many manufactures switching over to water cooling as the cost of such cooling systems drops and the need for more efficient cooling rises. I've also seen pics of a submersive machine and it is an interesting idea. I'm not sure that it will become mainstream, or even close to popular for quite a while.

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