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Garden irrigation


nodle
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So I built my wife two raised garden beds this year so that she could grow some vegetables. I am trying to make this easier for her on watering. I am going to setup a small drip style system. I purchased a valve box this morning along with a automated timer. I am going to bury most of the valve box, then line the bottom with 3/4" crushed with some weed mat in case there are any drips. I thought about an o-ring style box at first this morning, but now I understand that you want it to be breathable for the moisture. Inside I will be placing a one port timer. I was going to go with a two port timer for each box, but it's just vegetables and I don't think each box need a separate timer cycle. I will then add a pressure reducer behind it followed by a 2-way valve for each line. This is where I haven't decided if I am going to drop to a 1/2" hose then split of into 1/4", or what I will be doing. I am actually thinking about running to solid pvc up each side followed by a manifold, then run 1/4" lines from the manifold. Basically when I am done, it will kick on throughout the day at certain lengths and she won't have to touch it.
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Installed my control box last night. The hole was easier to dig than I thought. Lined in with meed mat real well then filled it with 3/4" clean. I will use the mattock next and lay a shallow trench for the tubing then bolt everything together.
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  • 2 weeks later...
I spent all day getting this installed today. Was a lot of work all by myself. Everything seems to work, but my two valve heads are leaking. I am going to have to pull them and re-apply some plumbers tape.
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  • 2 years later...

How's your grip irrigation setup working now?

 

Just this past weekend, we bought the Rain bird brand stuff from Menards and installed it for our new trees and shrubs (will do it for the garden next year). I love this type of system, was relatively cheap and easy to setup. I spend under $150, but could have done $50 less, but wanted to have some extra parts when we expand. This is one of those, "why didn't I do this earlier" type of things. I had a digital timer from some years ago that I put back in service and works great. I love the fact that you can configure and change the setup without much effort. I ran most things above ground since my landscaping allows it to run along the edge of the yard near the fence which is filled with rock and shrubs. Fixes would be cheap, fast, and easy to do since all the parts are economically priced and you can cut extra hose or put in a new end. My plan for winterizing it would be just to close the main house faucet, take out the timer, pressure regulator, and then blow out the hoses with an air compressor. I've read and talked to a co-worker who says they can sit out in the winter for many years without issue.

 

The basic setup is this:

 

1/2" main hose to route along to all areas.

 

1/4" hose lines to run to each sub-area or plant.

 

Barbed connectors to connect everything (mostly, straights, elbows and tees)

 

Emitters - Water end control - These come in mini drippers, sprayers, sprinklers, etc. that are rated at different gallons per hour or adjustable (I just did the drippers giving each shrub at least two spaced evenly.

 

Faucet connector/Pressure regulator - I bought a $15 kit that is a simple pressure reducer (required for drip systems), fine mesh screen/backflow prevention, and 3/4 thread to 1/2 hose adapter.

 

Digital timer (optional) - this makes life easier, don't even have to think about it and let the system run early in the morning or evening or both while sleeping or away on vacation.

 

 

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Mine turned out great, sounds like you have a nice setup. The digital timer is nice since you can program it, and they really do work. I think I have ours set for twice a day each day. Set it and forget it. When Winter approaches take your few things off, hook up an air compressor and blow out the lines, then you are good to go. Our small gardens did real well this year (peas overload!).
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