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Airbrushes


nodle
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I have been researching them the last few nights. You basically have a mini air compressor and the airbrush itself that you press down on to start the air flowing then pull back to make a wider path. They are pretty cheap to pick up. Then I would need to get a spray booth to vent it. I didn't know you were into models @ndboarder ?
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I had a friend in high school who was big into models. I think he had one of those small airbrushes but not sure. I know one time I went to his house and he had his room all setup with models and models parts everywhere. We used to also look at all the models at kmart and walmart back when they actually carried a whole section of them.

 

When you feel you need to actually get a booth though is when it's time to pull back a little. Seriously, an actual full blown paint booth for models? I am kidding and I guess I shouldn't talk with my game addiction.

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. I didn't know you were into models @ndboarder ?

Back when I was maybe 15 or younger. It's been a long time since I worked on anything like that. Used to look at kits in stores and think about it a bit more recently, but never did get back into it. Now even if I wanted to, I don't recall the last time I saw any in a local store.

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I had a friend in high school who was big into models. I think he had one of those small airbrushes but not sure. I know one time I went to his house and he had his room all setup with models and models parts everywhere. We used to also look at all the models at kmart and walmart back when they actually carried a whole section of them.

When you feel you need to actually get a booth though is when it's time to pull back a little. Seriously, an actual full blown paint booth for models? I am kidding and I guess I shouldn't talk with my game addiction.

Ask @jmanz how I go. When I go I go all out. Go E or go home.

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Back when I was maybe 15 or younger. It's been a long time since I worked on anything like that. Used to look at kits in stores and think about it a bit more recently, but never did get back into it. Now even if I wanted to, I don't recall the last time I saw any in a local store.

Yes it is a lost art. Still a underground community for it. I just find them relaxing. Nothing like putting some music on and doing one.

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I had a friend in high school who was big into models. I think he had one of those small airbrushes but not sure. I know one time I went to his house and he had his room all setup with models and models parts everywhere. We used to also look at all the models at kmart and walmart back when they actually carried a whole section of them.

When you feel you need to actually get a booth though is when it's time to pull back a little. Seriously, an actual full blown paint booth for models? I am kidding and I guess I shouldn't talk with my game addiction.

 

http://i.imgur.com/hJLOmRp.gif

 

On a serious note. My dad used to paint models. The more that he tried to store his hobby in boxes or in the closet, the less he was into them. He used to have dioramas that spanned 1'x2'

 

I recall he had a small compressor, but I never saw him use it.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I'm interested in how your air brushing works. Guess I never had any kind of mixing plate, putty, etc, but I recall painting any surfaces to be an absolute nightmare. Could never get an even coat that looked any good, other than maybe in blacks if you painted it enough time. Try to use some other colors and you'd just get a lot of dark/light spots and it would go to hell in a handbasket faster if you tried to do anything about them
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I think it's fairly easy. I think there are alot of tips like making sure your mixture of paint to thinner is correct. (Suppose to be the consistency of milk). Also making sure you are not spraying to close and starting with a light coat at first then applying more coats. I have been watching tons of videos in preparation for it. Like I said once things settle down I will get into it.
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What do you use for paint? I've really only worked on these when I was quite a bit younger and it was all Testor branded paint. Don't recall any need to mix or do anything like that, just shake up the bottle and apply a crappy looking paint job with a crappy little brush...
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Testors was just cheap paint available to all mass stores. I will probably be using Vallejo for primer. They do make paints also. Suppose to be made for airbrushes and pre-mixed (alot of people still thin them). Paint wise Tamiya is probably the best acrylic paint for models.
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What do you use for paint? I've really only worked on these when I was quite a bit younger and it was all Testor branded paint. Don't recall any need to mix or do anything like that, just shake up the bottle and apply a crappy looking paint job with a crappy little brush...

I had similar experiences. I remember painting matchbox cars, yeah that didn't go well.

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The main thing that has me interested in your progress/experience is that about the time you started this thread I happened to be in a local craft supply store and saw models along with supplies (like the cheap Testor paints).

 

Saw they had a model 1967 GTO which would be fun to build, but if the paint job came out like those I did as a kid it would be a waste of time and money.

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I think it really comes down to how patient you are. Model making and especially painting the model comes down to having patients and taking your time to do a good job. Work on one small part at a time until it's perfect.
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Yeah, I'm sure that has a lot to do with it. Knowing the correct process, having the right tools/supplies helps as well. I just remember some of the brighter colors would never go on evenly and as you tried to fix them one area or another just got darker, or things started to dry and smudge. Primer probably would've helped. Who knew you were supposed to put primer on models...
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lol ya I remember doing some older models. To do a good job I believe the parts need to be cleaned first in a mixture of light soapy water, to remove dust and oils from your fingerprints etc. Primer will help a whole bunch. Plus using a brush you will normally get stroke marks from thick paint. That's whats nice about an airbrush it just looks baked on.
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Ya like there are about two makers that make the best brand stuff. You can also get ones with an extra holding tank for air. But most of those pro ones are for people painting murals, t-shirts and other things where you will be running it for hours and cause it to heat up. I am just going to go with a basic one at first and will be plenty for model making.
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