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ryanator

Is college a scam?

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Do you think college is a scam? Just to note, this isn't negativity towards an individual person wanting to pursue college in the right way, it's very commendable that a person has the mindset to better themselves.

I tend to believe for our society as a whole, college is mostly useless and just gets people wasting money and precious years rather being able to develop real life skills or hands on experience. Though my question is not about a degree being important with getting your foot inside the door, as it did for me, but I carried my personality and "knack" to learn computer systems at my first job.

I've been thinking of this the past couple of years that a piece of paper certifying you of what you did just really isn't worth it to society anymore. I believe that we could get our most useful skills for ourselves and a career through 18 to 20 years of age.

College's goal isn't to teach you creative skills, but just things that everyone already knows. Of course this sounds useful, but it is our own selves and creativity that propels our society further. I only believe that a small percentage of people need college to refine a doctorate level of skills. In a way, college is a status symbol, just like needing that soccer of a mom Escalade or (silly cill surburban ;)).

With a buckling economy, rising cost of everything especially college fees makes for a bad outcome. Also when automation is going to soar, we won't need all this useless college degrees that people run around with. Remember, college is a for profit business, they offer you a product with no money back. You could argue by the saying that your knowledge is the greatest possession as no one can take it. Though if we are talking in a figurative sense, then yes, people are taking your knowledge every day as you drone yourself through your boring repetitive job.

I leave you with this, suck it class 2014 (and most of the rest), welcome out of your institution and into the real world. They should start making half way houses for college graduates, they are more likely going to need them.

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Whenever I hear about high unemployment, people with degrees working outside of the profession they studied for,I think about all of those people in college and wonder what work will they be doing when they get out?

It is not apparent that the money that colleges take in gets reinvested into the school.

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I don't know what I would call college. I guess my view has always been that for me it was 4 years and a bunch of $$ to get a piece of paper I needed to get seriously looked at by companies for a job in the field I wanted to be in. I spent 2 years in computer science, transferred and spent the next 2 changing to Computer Information Systems. When it comes to my work I basically claim to know a little about a lot and a lot about little. Having background in both development and computer systems in general works out fairly well though.

BUT, there wasn't honestly that much about either of those that I learned in college. I picked up a lot on my own outside of school and before college, and have picked up a lot more since college.

If companies could find motivated learners out of high school, I think they would come out ahead by hiring kids then and paying a smaller wage for 2-3 years while they were trained and learned on the job. Basically longer term paid internships with a promise of moving up to full pay.

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At one time I don't think college was a scam. But for awhile it sure has been. I do consider college a scam. From the tuition to the cost of books and their revisions. I mean why do books have to cost $300? Only to have the revised the next year so you can't re-use them? That right there is a scam.

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When I made the topic, I knew "scam" was a harsh word and doesn't fully represent what I wanted to get across, but it gets the point across quicker. I don't think it's a conspiracy, it's not like there is this great power that is scheming the system up, it's more of the nature of the system kind of thing.

I think the system as a whole is going the wrong direction. Supply and demand applies here too. Colleges have generated so much overhead that goes to things other than the teachers and education themselves. It's becoming more what a college can represent to the public, whether it's their education or sports programs and such.

There are many interesting articles if you search for "college scam" or something more politically correct. They hit on the points about how overhead and greed are overtaking the system, along with too many "overqualified" people becoming the norm.

It's nice that we have the freedom to choose our own major study, but on the other hand, our society can't support the need for a majority of graduates.

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It's nice that we have the freedom to choose our own major study, but on the other hand, our society can't support the need for a majority of graduates.

+1

Where are all of these people going to work when they are done with school.

It would be quite another thing if there was an industry that was pipeline-ing students from high school to college or trade school to a long term career. But there isn't. The market gets saturated with qualified/overqualified workers and that drives the price down.

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Take out you loans that you will pay on for another 30 years, only to find out that you can't get a job to pay off those loans. The American way.

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Take out you loans that you will pay on for another 30 years, only to find out that you can't get a job to pay off those loans. The American way.

Given the time of year, I'd say it was about 10 years ago I got out of college. Thanks to some state plans to pay back some of my loans for me over the last few years, I just got rid of them a few weeks ago.

Would've been paying for quite a few more years, as mine were old enough to be at a very low rate, so it never would've made sense to pay more than minimum monthly payments with other higher interest loans like housing or vehicles to consider as well.

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I would stop short of calling college a scam, however the days of thinking you can attend a 4 year university, and come out and write your own ticket in a majority of jobs is over. If someone thinks they are going to get a 4 year degree in university studies, art, or another non specialized or low demand degree and make 50k off the bat they are delusional. That along with rising costs, someone should definitley have a plan in mind before signing up, no longer should you think you can attend for a 2 years blindly then figure it out. The loans will have you tied up in debt until your late 30s or early 40s.

I feel a 1-2 trade degree with decent demand is for the most part a more efficeint plan. Ex: electrical lineman, dental assistant, diesel mechanic ect... Clearly if you want to be an engineer, doctor, or other high paying occupation, you will need the extra years of higher ed.

I would encourage any graduate not knowing what they are going to do to join national guard, learn life, learn what you like, then a few years later have your education payed for and have the mind set and world experience that you will start, finish, and succeed afterwards. If that is not for them, work different entry level jobs and learn life that way.

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I would encourage any graduate not knowing what they are going to do to join national guard, learn life, learn what you like, then a few years later have your education payed for and have the mind set and world experience that you will start, finish, and succeed afterwards. If that is not for them, work different entry level jobs and learn life that way.

That's a heck of a good plan you laid out

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I feel a 1-2 trade degree with decent demand is for the most part a more efficeint plan. Ex: electrical lineman, dental assistant, diesel mechanic ect... Clearly if you want to be an engineer, doctor, or other high paying occupation, you will need the extra years of higher ed.

I would encourage any graduate not knowing what they are going to do to join national guard, learn life, learn what you like, then a few years later have your education payed for and have the mind set and world experience that you will start, finish, and succeed afterwards. If that is not for them, work different entry level jobs and learn life that way.

Well said. Unfortunately some people don't have patience to do this. People want things now, or they have themselves tied down where they are at and feel they need to make ends meet and eventually things lead one to another.

I believe a 1-2 year trade school is where it's at, most people would benefit from this more than anything, but society still sees the golden 4 year degree as the standard.

America is facing issues, and thus a domino effect ensues. But, we are still a strong developed nation, just with a lot of waste and greed running rampant.

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I don't know for certain, but with the draw down I don't think they will need to maintain the same numbers as in the recent years. Well need to get some of that global warming sea level rise, or WW III.

Drones on the other hand, that is a whole new world. If I was just out of high school, I'd head towards that. I worked with a guy from the Philippines when I lived in Texas. He said that they didn't have higher learning in the same way we did. He said by the time they were in the 10th year, they already had a career path and they were studying to compete with other students to be selected.

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I wouldn't say college is a scam but more a costly risk. A lot of what they offer isn't taught very well for real world jobs. They mostly do a good job for teaching degrees, nursing and doctors. A lot of it is how the classes are taught. I'm sorry but making a student read, come to class for an hour or longer lecture expecting them to know what notes to take and then having exams is not the best teaching strategy. Hands on work and interactive learning is what needs to be done. Books should only be used for reference or for help when needed. People shouldn't be made to have to memorize what is in the book or what the professor/teacher talked about then take a test on it.

Real world jobs you aren't required to know everything without being able to look in a book, search online or get help from others. All degrees should have internships and hands on training because how else will anyone learn real world job skills? Take computer science. Sure I can learn what a byte and bit is but what good does that do when I have to remove viruses, reload an OS or setup a server? None! All tests should be allowed to use a book or other resources to find answers. Heck even have tests in groups where people solve problems together. It seems colleges and school for that matter is more setup to see who is smartest and who can remember things better. Sure it's fine for grade school and high school and depends on the subject because everyone needs to learn the basics but higher education and more specialized subjects should be a hands on learning experience.

Does any of that make sense?

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Makes sense. Our memorization is important on basic skills, but after that, we should only need books for reference or utilizing computers to handle the more complex problems. (This is not to say robots and calculators taking over for basic skills, we should learn those at minimum). Our bodies and mind are limited, when we cram all the memorization info in, I think it becomes counterproductive to handle the tasks the physical tasks we are more apt to do.

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Real world jobs you aren't required to know everything without being able to look in a book, search online or get help from others.

Exactly

As many would agree, and from my experience, it's all just expensive hoops to get you into this social club that exists so that "higher ups" feel safer about letting you in on their businesses. I've been to 4 different universities/community colleges. My experiences were quite bad, despite me having moderate success.

I don't know about "scam" but it's certainly not the best system anymore, especially with the global use of the internet. The only aspect that remains is some kind of pseudo-social aspect that students try to experience as part of their growing up phase. I found college to be extremely hollow, a far cry from what grade school/high school attempted to prepare me for. Perhaps that's because of how quickly the world changed during high school, though.

I have a lot more negative things to say, but I will stop there.

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I believe more focus should be put on apprenticeships and 2-year associate degrees for most people.  And this doesn't have to mean lesser pay, just more focus on doing what a person wants to do through more hands on experience.  Only higher level technical people need more advanced degrees. 

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