Wansview IP Cam

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Anyone have any experience with these? Picked a 1080p outdoor wireless one for my dad. I emailed them for the tool to turn off P2P and DDNS. Reviews were fairly decent and the price was right. 
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
No but from looking at it it reminds me of a generic Foscam camera. Basically Chinese clones of one each other, but they work good. There are so many cameras out there. The market the last two years has gotten flooded with IP cameras. You can walk into a Walmart and the shelves are lined. I had one just like the one you posted it always worked good, but since moving I have yet to hook it back up. Just make sure to change the default user password, maybe even the port number if possible as well.
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Yeh they are nice from a property security aspect. If someone comes into the yard while we are gone, it'll capture their plates from the motion detection. I'll have to remind myself to not forget to change the password and port number. 
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
Have not seen these.  Main issue with most IP cams is how well they will hold up in different types of weather.  I know a few that use camera systems from ReoLink.  I have a couple from HikVision
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Those look  pretty nice. It's more money but, I reckon a feller gets what he pays for. We put out some Panasonic IP cams for FWS (on an island in the middle of a 3200 acre lake). Buggers are tougher than nails. Right out in the open at 30 below and never skip a beat. (except for when the sun isn't out and doesn't charge the batteries)
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
Those nest outdoor ones are a ripoff..  Operating temp only rated down to -4 F,  also the power cable and runs over WiFi.  If you happen to have a power outlet where you want to put the camera that is tamper proof great.

Personally I prefer PoE cameras - get a better outdoor rating, no need to run electrical and more resilient connectivity.  Something like the Arlo from netgear would be a better option over the Nest cam - at least it's fully wireless you just have to remember to charge them
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
Pretty sweet little cameras.

https://www.arlo.com/en-us/
I have my doubts about them as well, a little spendy for me to justify testing one out for the heck of it.  But I'd be more interested in them than the Nest outdoor.  I'll stick with my PoE cams though.  Wired > WiFi for 99% of use cases.  The one time I might try WiFi would be if I were mounting it across the yard somewhere and I didn't want to trench in cable, but that is also a case where WiFi range and reliability could really come into play.
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
WiFi range and reliability could really come into play.
I think the reliability would be there, but you would want something with something like AC built in for higher data transfer rate if possible. I haven't looked to see what most wireless IP cameras use but I would at least think a minimum of a N.
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
I think the reliability would be there, but you would want something with something like AC built in for higher data transfer rate if possible. I haven't looked to see what most wireless IP cameras use but I would at least think a minimum of a N.
WiFi is flaky stuff man - just in a house depending on construction and such the coverage can vary.  Get outside your place with varying temperatures and weather conditions it can fluctuate more.   If you just want them for checking in on something here and there and for the look of security that's OK.  If you want to know it's working you don't use WiFi.  yes, WiFi will be working most of the time, and wired could go down if some hardware fails, but still for an actual security system go wired as much as absolutely possible
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
WiFi is flaky stuff man - just in a house depending on construction and such the coverage can vary.  Get outside your place with varying temperatures and weather conditions it can fluctuate more.   If you just want them for checking in on something here and there and for the look of security that's OK.  If you want to know it's working you don't use WiFi.  yes, WiFi will be working most of the time, and wired could go down if some hardware fails, but still for an actual security system go wired as much as absolutely possible
I agree with you on being wired or POE also. But I am just saying I would try an wireless IP cam. I know it's all about pumping the data downstream, plus I know first hand about weather affecting wireless (remember @C Pav when we had to do wireless and the ice getting into the wireless connections in winter on that city wide network? Ughhh) PLus your right brick, wood, metals can do all sorts of funky this to wirless waves. You congested neighborhood will make a difference depending on how many channels are being used. Plus even using a N, or AC your range fluctuates the speed of the transfer as well. I guess in my head I think of my front door or back door, and me being in an area with only about 2 more access points in the area I would give it a try, but everyone will be different and your results may vary.
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
I picked dad up a Ubiquiti Networks UAP-AC-LR-US 802.11ac Long Range Access Point. I'm hoping it's not so strong that it'll drive him out of the house. At the barn it was putting out 5 bars signal strength on his cell phone WiFi. When they say 600 feet, I believe they may be telling the truth.  
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Just got contacted by FWS. Panasonics are down. Probably a Pelican dive bombed the structure. We put a metal cone on the top to protect and a year ago a pelican hit that at full speed. Big ass dent in the cone. I suppose they've now managed to plow into the equipment  box or antenna enclosure. We use a cradlepoint router to feed the cameras and Verizon usb card. 
 

jmanz

I bought you the sims
Members
Just got contacted by FWS. Panasonics are down. Probably a Pelican dive bombed the structure. We put a metal cone on the top to protect and a year ago a pelican hit that at full speed. Big ass dent in the cone. I suppose they've now managed to plow into the equipment  box or antenna enclosure. We use a cradlepoint router to feed the cameras and Verizon usb card. 
I think one of them thought it was "happy time" with the camera.
 
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