Two Weeks

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Notice is what one is to give employers prior to leaving. Where did this tradition come from and, why do they not afford their employees the same prior to terminating them? Seems lop sided to me. What's good for the goose is always good for the gander.
 

Ludacris

Fluxoid's Doctor
Members
It's thought of as being a polite thing to do; notifing your employer two weeks prior to your departure.  Alot of people do this so that they will get a fair reference for their new job.  I don't think it would be wise to piss off your former employer incase you did need them for a reference later.  In the case of them letting you go without notice, that's not nice.  Most places that need to make cuts will actually let workers finish out their scheduled shifts before laying them off.  However, if you get let go because of something stupid you did, then it's your fault and you have to take responsibility for being a moron. 
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
It's thought of as being a polite thing to do; notifing your employer two weeks prior to your departure.  Alot of people do this so that they will get a fair reference for their new job.  I don't think it would be wise to piss off your former employer incase you did need them for a reference later.  In the case of them letting you go without notice, that's not nice.  Most places that need to make cuts will actually let workers finish out their scheduled shifts before laying them off.  However, if you get let go because of something stupid you did, then it's your fault and you have to take responsibility for being a moron. 
One could notify them and then use your vacation time to fulfil the 2 week requirement? I think they hold a guy hostage with that "good reference" thing. Maybe they should also be peer reviewed and have their merits posted on some government site?
 

Ludacris

Fluxoid's Doctor
Members
It's thought of as being a polite thing to do; notifing your employer two weeks prior to your departure.  Alot of people do this so that they will get a fair reference for their new job.  I don't think it would be wise to piss off your former employer incase you did need them for a reference later.  In the case of them letting you go without notice, that's not nice.  Most places that need to make cuts will actually let workers finish out their scheduled shifts before laying them off.  However, if you get let go because of something stupid you did, then it's your fault and you have to take responsibility for being a moron. 
One could notify them and then use your vacation time to fulfil the 2 week requirement? I think they hold a guy hostage with that "good reference" thing. Maybe they should also be peer reviewed and have their merits posted on some government site?
I did that once. First I put in for two weeks of vacation, then I put in for my final two weeks, lol
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
It's thought of as being a polite thing to do; notifing your employer two weeks prior to your departure.  Alot of people do this so that they will get a fair reference for their new job.  I don't think it would be wise to piss off your former employer incase you did need them for a reference later.  In the case of them letting you go without notice, that's not nice.  Most places that need to make cuts will actually let workers finish out their scheduled shifts before laying them off.  However, if you get let go because of something stupid you did, then it's your fault and you have to take responsibility for being a moron. 
One could notify them and then use your vacation time to fulfil the 2 week requirement? I think they hold a guy hostage with that "good reference" thing. Maybe they should also be peer reviewed and have their merits posted on some government site?
I did that once. First I put in for two weeks of vacation, then I put in for my final two weeks, lol
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
I can't speak for everywhere, but for those of us in ND, I'll clue you in on how this works.  North Dakota is a "right to hire, right to fire state" so your job is not safe and you can basically be terminated for any reason at any time.  While two weeks notice is considered the polite thing to do, allowing the employer time to begin looking for a replacement, you do not need to provide any notice what so ever (though as has been stated, don't expect a good reference if leaving on poor terms... I have a habit of doing this, though I never need the reference either)

Employers can, however, put a required length of notice into an employment contract.  If they choose to do this, they must also abide by that length when terminating employees (in ND anyhow).  They can't have their cake and eat it too, meaning either both parties can terminate immediately, or both have to give the same amount of notice.  Most companies don't do this, because it puts them at needing to give notice and if an employee up and leaves, they usually can't do much about it.

On the topic of using vacation to fulfill your two weeks, that is basically the same as giving no notice.  Your accrued vacation time is a liability to the employer, in the event that you leave your position, they are required to pay you for that time.  So if you have two weeks of vacation to burn, and don't need to leave immediately I'd suggest that you work your two weeks and take the two weeks of vacation in the form of a check.
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
I have worked places where when you put your two weeks in the employer gets mad. After i turned in my two weeks once, 2 days later they go,well you can go home now. I was like WTF but whatever more time off for me. It wasn't just me though they did this to everyone. I think they think you are a "traitor" or something.
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
I can't speak for everywhere, but for those of us in ND, I'll clue you in on how this works.  North Dakota is a "right to hire, right to fire state" so your job is not safe and you can basically be terminated for any reason at any time.  While two weeks notice is considered the polite thing to do, allowing the employer time to begin looking for a replacement, you do not need to provide any notice what so ever (though as has been stated, don't expect a good reference if leaving on poor terms... I have a habit of doing this, though I never need the reference either)

Employers can, however, put a required length of notice into an employment contract.  If they choose to do this, they must also abide by that length when terminating employees (in ND anyhow).  They can't have their cake and eat it too, meaning either both parties can terminate immediately, or both have to give the same amount of notice.  Most companies don't do this, because it puts them at needing to give notice and if an employee up and leaves, they usually can't do much about it.

On the topic of using vacation to fulfill your two weeks, that is basically the same as giving no notice.  Your accrued vacation time is a liability to the employer, in the event that you leave your position, they are required to pay you for that time.  So if you have two weeks of vacation to burn, and don't need to leave immediately I'd suggest that you work your two weeks and take the two weeks of vacation in the form of a check.
Ya you earned the vacation anyways, it's your right.
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
I can't speak for everywhere, but for those of us in ND, I'll clue you in on how this works.  North Dakota is a "right to hire, right to fire state" so your job is not safe and you can basically be terminated for any reason at any time.  While two weeks notice is considered the polite thing to do, allowing the employer time to begin looking for a replacement, you do not need to provide any notice what so ever (though as has been stated, don't expect a good reference if leaving on poor terms... I have a habit of doing this, though I never need the reference either)

Employers can, however, put a required length of notice into an employment contract.  If they choose to do this, they must also abide by that length when terminating employees (in ND anyhow).  They can't have their cake and eat it too, meaning either both parties can terminate immediately, or both have to give the same amount of notice.  Most companies don't do this, because it puts them at needing to give notice and if an employee up and leaves, they usually can't do much about it.

On the topic of using vacation to fulfill your two weeks, that is basically the same as giving no notice.  Your accrued vacation time is a liability to the employer, in the event that you leave your position, they are required to pay you for that time.  So if you have two weeks of vacation to burn, and don't need to leave immediately I'd suggest that you work your two weeks and take the two weeks of vacation in the form of a check.
I magine a Union shop changes things up a bit.
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
I have worked places where when you put your two weeks in the employer gets mad. After i turned in my two weeks once, 2 days later they go,well you can go home now. I was like WTF but whatever more time off for me. It wasn't just me though they did this to everyone. I think they think you are a "traitor" or something.
This just happened to me when I left Valley.  It's also why I know they can't "have their cake and eat it too" because they had me required to give 30 days, and they could terminate immediately.  That didn't fly, and rather than tomorrow being my last day, they put me on the street after work monday.  My theory was the same... nice little vacation week... plus they still have to pay me for all my vacation time.
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
I have worked places where when you put your two weeks in the employer gets mad. After i turned in my two weeks once, 2 days later they go,well you can go home now. I was like WTF but whatever more time off for me. It wasn't just me though they did this to everyone. I think they think you are a "traitor" or something.
This just happened to me when I left Valley.  It's also why I know they can't "have their cake and eat it too" because they had me required to give 30 days, and they could terminate immediately.  That didn't fly, and rather than tomorrow being my last day, they put me on the street after work monday.  My theory was the same... nice little vacation week... plus they still have to pay me for all my vacation time.
:lol:
 
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