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Dewalt tools

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
I just think that batteries have come along way and are able to power a lot more. Maybe the older ones were bad, but my Dewalt skillsaw cuts though 2x4's like butter. Mind you I haven't cut tons and tons at a time but I can cut what I need and not even think about the battery. I was considering the chainsaw for taking out in the woods for some light firewood cutting.
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
They've come a ways, but still - he has the biggest battery they make for it to do his 100 cuts of kind of sort of 6x6 lumber.  Depending on what you cut or run into the number could be drastically different, and the battery performance will decrease over time.

His point of not having to worry about a motor in comparison to gas powered is partially valid.  You don't really have to worry about it, but if the motor on your cordless tools goes out you basically just have to buy a new one if it isn't under warranty (I've had this happen once).  On a gas one there's a chance of repair, though whether it's feasible or not is tough.

For light cutting it could be great and may last quite a while before needing a new battery or to be completely replaced.  If your out cutting and your battery dies though, time to go home and wait for a charge.  For my money though, I'd still buy a gas powered chainsaw.  It will run when I need and if I do a lot of cutting I can just fill up the gas tank and keep on cutting.  I would go to a Stihl dealer and for light cutting maybe take something from the "home owner" line of saws, but most likely I'd just pick up something more heavy duty so I knew it could handle the little work I had plan and any big project that might come up someday  (I've learned my lesson about buying the "good enough" tool for one project that later isn't good enough and then having to buy another better one too)
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
I am not even going to bother anymore. Bought some hacksaw blades from another store that were complete junk. Returned them and picked up some Dewalt ones. Yes they were almost double the price, but so much nicer. Just go with quality out the door.
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
Our local store had a killer deal on a two pack of the XR 5 batteries. I went on Amazon to compare and they were $50 cheaper, I couldn't pass up the deal. I should be pretty set now on batteries.
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
So my parents came over yesterday and brought me a new toy. I don't know what I am suppose to do with it though lol.

 

ryanator

Mathematical
Members
So my parents came over yesterday and brought me a new toy. I don't know what I am suppose to do with it though lol.


Reciprocating saws are one of the most common tools yet I've never had use for one nor liked using it.  The cuts I needed to use were more awkward and off hand that it makes the whole tool vibrate and can't get a good hold.  I just use a jig saw for everything I needed.  I guess these would really be handy at tear down and rebuilding work.
 
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nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
Reciprocating saws are one of the most common tools yet I've never had use for one nor liked using it.  The cuts I needed to use were more awkward and off hand that it makes the whole tool vibrate and can't get a good hold.  I just use a jig saw for everything I needed.  I guess these would really be handy at tear down and rebuilding work.
Ya well one thing you can also use them for is limb trimming etc. You can buy longer blades my Dad showed me. I think it may come in use for camping next summer. It would be perfect for cutting small limbs etc. for campfires. But I am like you, I don't know what I would use it for. I see Dewalt also makes a cordless jigsaw, may have to check that out too. I am getting quite a collection of Dewalt tools now lol.
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
I have a cordless jigsaw and the recip. saw.  The recip is good for fast cuts that don't need to be overly accurate and also especially for metal.  I use mine most commonly in place of having to go after something for a few minutes with a hacksaw and just get it over with in seconds. 
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
Got the 20 Volt to 18 Volt adapter for Christmas.  The kit that comes with 2 smaller 20V batteries, a charger and the adapter to use it with my 18V tools.  Guess time to mostly look at 20V bare tools if I add to collection, some larger 20V batteries down the line and if any 18V tools die out replacement with 20V.

Also got the Dewalt wrench/socket set I had seen at Costco that I mentioned over in another thread.  Found a pic of it as well

 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
I like that set. My boss gave me on top of a bonus a $350 gift certificate for Snap-on. We get a truck here each Wednesday. It sounds like a lot of money to spend on tools, but not at Snap-on prices. Way overpriced. Can't think of anything I really need so may just blow it all on a wrench set. Not knocking their tools, I think they make quality tools, but just not for what they ask for them.
 

ryanator

Mathematical
Members
Ya well one thing you can also use them for is limb trimming etc. You can buy longer blades my Dad showed me. I think it may come in use for camping next summer. It would be perfect for cutting small limbs etc. for campfires. But I am like you, I don't know what I would use it for. I see Dewalt also makes a cordless jigsaw, may have to check that out too. I am getting quite a collection of Dewalt tools now lol.
Saw this a little late, but..

 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
I'm a bit jealous.  I have a small Craftsman air compressor that is many years old and I would like to get something a bit bigger.  I've looked at the DeWalt air compressors a fair amount, but what I really want is something that won't come anywhere close to cheap.  A compressor capable of high volume low pressure for extended periods.  I haven't looked into what the highest CFM that compressor is capable of in depth yet though
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
The reason why we got this one was for the 5.0 cfm. To be able to run power tools.


Specifications


  • CFM @ 100 PSI 5.0 CFM
  • Drive Belt Drive
  • Horsepower 1.6 HP
  • Power Supply 120 volts
  • Pump Speed 1,750 rpm
  • Shipping Weight 94 lbs
  • Tank Size 15 gal
  • Tool Height 44.75 in
  • Tool Length 24.50 in
  • Tool Weight 92 lbs
  • Tool Width 22.00 in


Product Detail page.
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
Yeah, most smaller air compressors like that are going to be 5.0 CFM (maybe less) - mostly they are all low HP compressors and the variable is how big of a tank they have to be able to maintain the High Pressure (100 psi) and Low volume air (5 CFM).  I'd ideally like a compressor capable of this, but also capable of low pressure (50 psi or less) and high volume (80+ CFM).  Then I could run any tool I have (or want), and also use it for spraying applications or blowing out sprinklers
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
Ya you can dial it in pretty precisely, I was even thinking I could run an air brush off of it in the future, (they run about 10psi). I don't think the noise it to bad, sounds more like a large vacuum. It's about the perfect size, and you can maneuver it around quite easy. Plus they had a sale going on it for $75 off which is why I picked it up.
 

ndboarder

Bill Gates' Gimp
Members
Yeah, turned way down the CFM would probably be high enough - but having to run it at such a low PSI likely wouldn't meet some of what I'd like to do.  Unfortunately to get exactly what I would like to have would probably be very cost prohibitive and require a two stage compressor which likely also means a 240V power supply - which means more bills/work to run a 240 plug somewhere.  In addition, having a huge 80-120 gallon tank on most such models and taking up a lot of space while also losing portability.

So while that would be awesome, I don't have that much room or need for such a thing to want to do all that.  So Likely at some point I"ll just end up with something very similar to what you have
 

ryanator

Mathematical
Members
I bought the Makita five years ago. It's a high horse power portable contractor grade compressor, has great CFM at both 40 and 90 psi settings(6.9, 6.5 respectively), but lacks a larger tank thus high volume.  It has however proven itself using two nailers for a full roof job at once and also you can use a low volume sprayer for everything except car spray jobs( which require  high volume no matter what as to not run out of air and having over-lap marks)



  • Maximum Horsepower : 3 HP
  • Running Horsepower : 2.1 HP
  • Tank : 5.2 gal.
  • Performance (40 PSI) : 6.9 CFM
  • Performance (90 PSI) : 6.5 CFM
  • Maximum Pressure : 140 PSI
  • Net Weight : 88 lbs. 
  • Pump : Oil lubricated
  • Gas or electric : Electric
  • Shipping Weight : 107 lbs.
     
 
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