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Cuencanos are feeling like strangers in their own city

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
"Bleeding the public healthcare system" but it's ok for the illegals to do that to us though? Will they have to reprogram their phone systems for English and Spanish? A tiny violin is playing for them somewhere for all their woes. 

“Cuenca never wanted to attract retirees,” said Ana Paulina Crespo, the director of international relations for the municipality. “In fact, we’re facing lots of problems over how to deal with a phenomenon that we aren’t responsible for creating.”

The city is trying to combat local fears that the retirees are both driving up land prices and bleeding the public healthcare system, she said. And the language barrier has become a source of local irritation. Some restaurants and even neighborhoods seem like English-only spaces.

Cuencanos are feeling like strangers in their own city,” she said.
Retirees flock to Latin America
 

ryanator

Mathematical
Members
I've been to Ecuador three times this last year, and felt guilty each time being a "Gringo" because of this happening.  I haven't been as far south to Cuenca (the most heavily Gringo population), but have been around the Northern part including Quito.  When we went to Cotocachi ( a nice smaller northern mountain city), they are experiencing this problem also.  I looked at a few houses and talked to a local hotel owner about real estate, and can confirm this.  The issue is not just Americans, but also Europeans and Asian's who can afford to invest in real estate.  Many buy up real estate to rent or sell and live in a gated community themselves, separating themselves.  He said the best thing is to buy a house within the community and of course learn the language (Spanish).
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
They could do like Toronto and impose a 15 % tax on foreigners. (although that doesn't seem to be slowing it down)
 

nodle

Cheesemonger
Administrator
A similar story is a Rancher that my Dad knew. Once he started getting older, he sold the ranch converted a lot of his money into gold and bought a place down in Mexico with maids etc. Or money was worth so much down there, plus their medical and prescriptions were better than here and he needed them because of his age.
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Jeff Berwick (Dollar Vigilante) talks about living in Mexico. Says he much more free there than when he was in Canada or the States. He presents a pretty negative opinion of the US. 

 
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jmanz

I bought you the sims
Members
Jesse Ventura lives in Mexico too. Loves it. Location arbitrage is getting more and more common. I've read a lot of people are working, saving up large sums of money, and then retiring young to relatively poor countries to live on the cheap. Some find it hard to deal with after awhile but some do quite well. Depends on the person.
 

Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Does it not seem ironic? We are fast becoming the "poor country." 
 
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Davidc

Caulk Sucker
Members
Can I move to Mexico and go on welfare? Can I carry an American flag through their streets protesting their resistance to my freeloading? Will they be willing to change their phone systems to support English and Spanish? Will they pay for my kids (If I had any) k-12 education? 
 
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